Impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the long-term mortality in patients who were treated by coronary artery bypass surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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diabetes mellitus 11 endocrinologydiseases
hyperinsulinemia 2 endocrinologydiseases
type 2 diabetes mellitus 8 endocrinologydiseases

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diabetes mellitus 32 Title: MedicineImpact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the long-term mortality in patients who were treated by coronary artery bypass surgeryA systematic
diabetes mellitus 744 artery bypass surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention. However, the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on mortality in patients who were treated by CABG was often ignored. Therefore, we aimed to compare
diabetes mellitus 2535 ignored that CABG remains the best revascularization strategy in these patients.Introduction1Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs).[[1]] Several studies showed CVDs to
diabetes mellitus 4122 mortality following CABG in patients with and without T2DM. The words “coronary artery bypass surgery and diabetes mellitus ” were the searched terms that were used. In addition, the abbreviations “CABG and DM” were also
diabetes mellitus 10463 represented in Fig. 2.Figure 2Mortality and adverse cardiovascular outcomes reported between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (1–15 years).When
diabetes mellitus 11013 1.87; P < .0001, I2 = 0% as shown in Fig. 4.Figure 3Long-term mortality observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (5–15 years).Figure
diabetes mellitus 11180 by coronary artery bypass surgery (5–15 years).Figure 4Long-term mortality observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (7–15 years).Several
diabetes mellitus 11916 long-term follow-up (Fig. 5).Figure 5All-cause mortality and cardiac death observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery.This analysis was
diabetes mellitus 13186 follow-up periods, respectively (Fig. 7).Figure 7Mortality at different time period observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery.Other adverse cardiovascular
diabetes mellitus 13988 I2 = 55%, the result was not statistically significant (Fig. 8).Figure 8Stroke reported between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (1–15 years).The
diabetes mellitus 16659 support this point, Bundhun et al also recently compared PCI and CABG in patients with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM). Their result showed CABG to be associated with a higher rate of stroke without statistically
hyperinsulinemia 18543 another reason contributing to a higher rate of mortality in patients with ITDM.[[24]] Also, iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia promoting proinflammatory macrophage response and stimulating hormonal hyperactivation of signal transduction
hyperinsulinemia 18701 response and stimulating hormonal hyperactivation of signal transduction pathway,[[25],[26]] endogenous hyperinsulinemia which could increase hepatic synthesis of cholesterol[[27]] could all be mechanisms suggested to contribute
type 2 diabetes mellitus 25 Title: MedicineImpact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the long-term mortality in patients who were treated by coronary artery bypass surgeryA systematic
type 2 diabetes mellitus 737 coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention. However, the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on mortality in patients who were treated by CABG was often ignored. Therefore, we aimed to compare
type 2 diabetes mellitus 10456 has been represented in Fig. 2.Figure 2Mortality and adverse cardiovascular outcomes reported between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (1–15 years).When
type 2 diabetes mellitus 11006 to 1.87; P < .0001, I2 = 0% as shown in Fig. 4.Figure 3Long-term mortality observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (5–15 years).Figure
type 2 diabetes mellitus 11173 revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (5–15 years).Figure 4Long-term mortality observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (7–15 years).Several
type 2 diabetes mellitus 11909 during this long-term follow-up (Fig. 5).Figure 5All-cause mortality and cardiac death observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery.This analysis was
type 2 diabetes mellitus 13179 follow-up periods, respectively (Fig. 7).Figure 7Mortality at different time period observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery.Other adverse cardiovascular
type 2 diabetes mellitus 13981 I2 = 55%, the result was not statistically significant (Fig. 8).Figure 8Stroke reported between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and non-T2DM following revascularization by coronary artery bypass surgery (1–15 years).The

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