Systematic literature review of Rift Valley fever virus seroprevalence in livestock, wildlife and humans in Africa from 1968 to 2016

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Rift Valley fever 71 Title: PLoS Neglected Tropical DiseasesSystematic literature review of Rift Valley fever virus seroprevalence in livestock, wildlife and humans in Africa from 1968 to 2016Alternative Title:
Rift Valley fever 222 livestock, wildlife and humans in Africa from 1968 to 2016Alternative Title: Systematic literature review of Rift Valley fever virus seroprevalence in AfricaMadeleine H. A. Clark (Conceptualization) (Data curation) (Formal analysis)
Rift Valley fever 1578 UNITED STATESPublication date (epub): 7/2018Publication date (collection): 7/2018AbstractBackground Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic arbovirus that causes severe disease in livestock and humans. The virus has
Rift Valley fever 3534 seroprevalence research to understand the true burden of disease on the African continent.SummaryAuthor summary Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a vector-borne virus that infects wildlife and livestock, and can subsequently spread
Rift Valley fever 4560 AvailabilityAll relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.Introduction Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic arbovirus that infects humans, livestock and wildlife species. The disease
Rift Valley fever 4691 is a zoonotic arbovirus that infects humans, livestock and wildlife species. The disease it causes, Rift Valley fever (RVF), is a World Health Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) listed disease and is a World Health Organisation
Rift Valley fever 7898 examine how seroprevalence was measured and calculated, including potential sources of bias. Reviews of Rift Valley fever epidemiology have evaluated the spatio-temporal, ecological, predictive risk factors and modelling methods
Rift Valley fever 9960 1).10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g001Fig 1Flowchart for the systematic review to identify eligible studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) seroprevalence in Africa.Seroprevalence was analysed separately for goats, sheep, cattle,
Rift Valley fever 12734 in Kenya alone (Fig 2).10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g002Fig 2Number and geographical distribution of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) seroprevalence studies in African countries.Although the first study included was conducted
Rift Valley fever 13397 outbreaks and one (0.6%) immediately after an outbreak.10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g003Fig 3Number of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) seroprevalence studies conducted in African countries by year study was conducted.More
Rift Valley fever 14970 5).10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g004Fig 4The distribution of seroprevalence (% individuals seropositive) for Rift Valley fever virus by species and decade in African countries, 1968–2016 (year study was conducted).10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g005Fig
Rift Valley fever 15171 conducted).10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.g005Fig 5Reported seroprevalence (% individuals seropositive) of Rift Valley fever virus in (A) cattle, (B) sheep, (C) goats, (D) camels, (E) humans and (F) wildlife in African countries,
Rift Valley fever 18962 humans in Africa identifying potential risk factors as significantly associated with seropositivity for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in final statistical model.Number of articles using statistical methods (out of 51 eligible
Rift Valley fever 19878 livestock in Africa identifying potential risk factors as significantly associated seropositivity for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV).Number of articles using statistical methods (out of 70 eligible articles)Risk factors
Rift Valley fever 21533 (72.5%) livestock seroprevalence eligible articles.10.1371/journal.pntd.0006627.t004Table 4Number of Rift Valley fever virus seroprevalence articles in Africa accounting for risk of bias outlined in the STROBE statement.SpeciesRandomisationRecruitmentExclusionEligibilityPower
Rift Valley fever 33460 informationS1 TablePRISMA checklist.(DOC)Click here for additional data file.S2 TableReported seroprevalence of Rift Valley fever virus in livestock, wildlife and humans in Africa, 1968–2016.(DOCX)Click here for additional data

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