Accounting for youth audiences' resistances to HIV and AIDS messages in the television drama Tsha Tsha in South Africa.

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AIDS 51 Title: SAHARA J : Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/ AIDS Research AllianceAccounting for youth audiences’ resistances to HIV and AIDS messages in the television
AIDS 130 Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research AllianceAccounting for youth audiences’ resistances to HIV and AIDS messages in the television drama Tsha Tsha in South AfricaBlessing MakwambeniAbiodun SalawuPublication
AIDS 445 on E-E efforts in Africa have largely focussed on understanding how and why interventions on HIV and AIDS are effective in influencing behaviour change among target communities. Very few studies have sought
AIDS 709 targeted audiences resist the preferred readings that are encoded into E-E interventions on HIV and AIDS . Using cultural studies as its conceptual framework and reception analysis as its methodology, this
AIDS 980 that subaltern black South African youths negotiate from Tsha Tsha, an E-E television drama on HIV and AIDS in South Africa. Results from the study show that HIV and AIDS messages in Tsha Tsha face substantial
AIDS 1043 Tsha, an E-E television drama on HIV and AIDS in South Africa. Results from the study show that HIV and AIDS messages in Tsha Tsha face substantial resistances from situated youth viewers whose social contexts
AIDS 1605 theoretical and methodological framework for evaluating the ‘impact’ of E-E interventions on HIV and AIDS .IntroductionThe E-E strategy, conceptualised as the strategic placement of educational content in entertainment
AIDS 2691 in Africa have largely focused on understanding how and why interventions, particularly on HIV and AIDS , have been effective in influencing behaviour change among target communities (see Cardey, Garforth,
AIDS 4535 E-E television drama serial in South Africa that engages young people on issues surrounding HIV and AIDS . This study is an offshoot of a broader study that investigated the production and reception of Tsha
AIDS 18789 historically and socially in order to investigate and account for their negotiation of the HIV and AIDS issues in the television drama.The television drama: Tsha TshaThe E-E television drama Tsha Tsha is
AIDS 19017 English subtitles) multi-part series focusing on young people living in a world affected by HIV and AIDS and other social problems (Parker, Ntlabati, & Hajiyiannis, [44]). It was initially developed to target
AIDS 19303 expanded to include all young adults. Tsha Tsha was developed and produced jointly by the Centre for AIDS Development, Research and Evaluation (CADRE) and Curious Pictures with technical support from the Health
AIDS 19627 Programs. The television drama has been supported financially by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Tsha Tsha has been broadcast
AIDS 19974 town in the Eastern Cape and explores young people’s lives as they transition to adulthood. HIV and AIDS is portrayed in the series along a continuum of aspects including prevention, care, support, treatment
AIDS 20494 used to entertain and educate young people in schools and prisons about issues surrounding HIV and AIDS in South Africa.Tsha Tsha’s macro context of consumptionTsha Tsha is produced and negotiated within
AIDS 20660 consumptionTsha Tsha is produced and negotiated within South Africa, a country with the largest burden of HIV and AIDS in the world (Zegeye, [59], p. 25). According to Statistics South Africa ([53], p. 3), the number
AIDS 20938 16.8% of adults aged 15–49 being HIV positive. However, it is worth noting that although HIV and AIDS afflicts all racial groups in South Africa, marginalised black people living in rural and urban informal
AIDS 21138 informal settlements are at the highest risk of infection. The race and class character of HIV and AIDS in the country shows that inequality and poverty are the main structural factors determining vulnerability
AIDS 21499 most vulnerable to infection (Zegeye, [59]). Youths’ vulnerability and continued exposure to HIV and AIDS are attributed to a highly contradictory and complex South African socio-cultural and economic context
AIDS 28807 reception analysis to investigate and account for black South African youths’ resistances to HIV and AIDS messages in Tsha Tsha. The study focused on series 1–3 which were available in DVD format from CADRE,
AIDS 32745 focus group discussion guide which consisted of guiding questions on key thematic issues on HIV and AIDS identified through qualitative content analysis. The guiding questions allowed for expanded discussion
AIDS 36514 effectiveness in entertaining and educating black South African youths on issues surrounding HIV and AIDS , Tsha Tsha encounters substantial resistances among its situated readers. The presence of wide-ranging
AIDS 36834 texts are unproblematically read by target audiences. Rather, what the audience resistances to HIV and AIDS issues in Tsha Tsha show is that context is central in audiences’ consumption of E-E texts as ‘it
AIDS 37358 audiences’ social contexts of reception and the formal properties of the text.Conceptualising HIV and AIDS Results from qualitative content analysis and document analysis indicate that Tsha Tsha seeks to provide
AIDS 37510 document analysis indicate that Tsha Tsha seeks to provide its audiences with a conception of HIV and AIDS which is based on scientific rationality. This discourse seeks to counter the hegemonic discourse around
AIDS 37628 based on scientific rationality. This discourse seeks to counter the hegemonic discourse around HIV and AIDS in black South African communities which articulates HIV and AIDS to ‘bad luck’ and ‘misfortune’
AIDS 37694 hegemonic discourse around HIV and AIDS in black South African communities which articulates HIV and AIDS to ‘bad luck’ and ‘misfortune’ in ways that perpetuate denialism, invincibility, avoidance of
AIDS 38156 African communities. It educates viewers about the causes, prevention mechanisms and impact of HIV and AIDS on individual families and the community through the experiences of principal characters.Audience reception
AIDS 38318 experiences of principal characters.Audience reception of Tsha Tsha’s lesson on the causes of HIV and AIDS shows significant resistance from youth audiences who negotiate the oppositional reading of the E-E
AIDS 38577 audience reading is reflected through Luxolo’s negotiation of Andile’s father’s death due to AIDS :Andile is not supposed to hate his father; the only problem is that he brought the hated disease into
AIDS 38717 father; the only problem is that he brought the hated disease into the family. When someone dies of AIDS like that we view that person as having been in the wrong place at the wrong time. We feel pity for
AIDS 38905 We feel pity for him, he is just a victim and we could even laugh.Luxolo’s negotiation of HIV and AIDS is consonant with the hegemonic ‘bad luck’ discourse in subaltern black South African communities
AIDS 39056 discourse in subaltern black South African communities which removes human agency from the HIV and AIDS matrix. Instead of attributing Andile’s father’s HIV infection and subsequent death from AIDS to
AIDS 39154 and AIDS matrix. Instead of attributing Andile’s father’s HIV infection and subsequent death from AIDS to multiple sexual partnerships as ‘preferred’ by the producers, Luxolo views him more as a victim.
AIDS 39426 in the E-E text derives from his interpretive community and its shared subjectivities about HIV and AIDS . Being a young man from Mbizana, a rural area in the Eastern Cape, Luxolo’s situated discourse on
AIDS 39539 young man from Mbizana, a rural area in the Eastern Cape, Luxolo’s situated discourse on HIV and AIDS acts as an alternative framework of reference in the meaning-making process (see Hall, [16], pp. 137–138).
AIDS 39802 reading is indicative of the significant dissonance between the encoders’ preferred reading of HIV and AIDS and his socially constructed discourse on HIV and AIDS (see Newbold, Boyd-Barrett, & Van Den Bulck,
AIDS 39857 the encoders’ preferred reading of HIV and AIDS and his socially constructed discourse on HIV and AIDS (see Newbold, Boyd-Barrett, & Van Den Bulck, [40]: 41) which is constructed and reinforced within a
AIDS 40084 community where frequent exposure to death, poverty and unemployment promotes a discourse of HIV and AIDS premised on invincibility and denialism (Motsemme, [37], p. 74; Zegeye & Maxted, [60], p. 13)Multiple
AIDS 40367 South Africa, Tsha Tsha links multiple sexual relationships to exposure and vulnerability to HIV and AIDS through the prism of principal characters like Andile and his ‘playboy’ father. By so doing, the
AIDS 40564 doing, the E-E drama promotes fidelity in relationships as a key preventive mechanism against HIV and AIDS . However, situated youth viewers’ negotiation of this lesson shows substantial resistance across gender
AIDS 44523 South Africa.Secondary abstinence and non-penetrative sexAudiences’ resistances to the key HIV and AIDS lessons in Tsha Tsha underscore the centrality of situated discourses in audiences’ negotiation of
AIDS 46109 rejection of non-penetration and secondary abstinence as viable preventive mechanisms in the age of HIV and AIDS also needs to be related back to audiences’ location within a novel sexual discourse that emphasises
AIDS 47097 social change agenda, Tsha Tsha also seeks to challenge hegemonic masculinities that perpetuate HIV and AIDS in black South African communities. In this regard, Tsha Tsha depicts male characters who transcend
AIDS 47500 sister’s presence takes over domestic chores at home when his mother is incapacitated by HIV and AIDS . Through Andile, Tsha Tsha’s producers sought to change socially constructed gender binaries that
AIDS 49469 challenges hegemonic feminine ideals of ‘reservedness’ and ‘meekness’ that perpetuate HIV and AIDS in black South African communities (see Motsemme, [37]). These ideals are confronted through Sis Wawi,
AIDS 49628 [37]). These ideals are confronted through Sis Wawi, an assertive woman who speaks openly about HIV and AIDS much to the annoyance of men in her conservative community. Results from the focus group discussions
AIDS 55838 Generations, and other soap operas in South Africa. In this light, resistances to key themes around HIV and AIDS in Tsha Tsha invariably show that the social contexts of consumption and other competing media discourses
AIDS 56467 of its situated youth viewers. The evidence of substantial resistances in the negotiation of HIV and AIDS messages in Tsha Tsha by subaltern black South African youths in the study reinforce findings from previous
AIDS 56755 substantial resistances in subaltern discursive spaces. The findings further show that E-E texts on HIV and AIDS encounter resistances in subaltern locales because the preferred meanings that are encoded into E-E
AIDS 57418 impact, design and delivery:First, the evidence of youths’ resistances in the negotiation of HIV and AIDS issues in Tsha Tsha largely result from the dissonance between the E-E text and the cultural baggage
AIDS 58951 order to fully understand and account for the substantial resistances that E-E interventions on HIV and AIDS face in subaltern discursive spaces, E-E impact studies need to embrace more nuanced methodological

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