Impact of Obesity on Long-Term Urinary Incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy: A Meta-Analysis.

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obesity 573 contribute to poor treatment outcomes. However, little is known concerning the relationship between obesity (body mass index [BMI] ⩾ 30) and the urinary incontinence (UI) of patients after radical prostatectomy
obesity 1241 Finally, four studies comprising 6 trials with 2890 participants were included. The results showed that obesity increased UI risk at 12 months in patients who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy
obesity 1514 [CI] [1.21, 4.88], P = 0.01). When stratified by the surgical methods, the pooled results showed that obesity increased UI risk at 24 months in patients who underwent RLRP (OR 2.00, 95% CI [1.57, 2.56], P < 0.001).
obesity 1735 in patients who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), the pooled results showed that obesity does not increase UI risk at 24 months (OR 1.13, 95% CI [0.74, 1.72], P = 0.58). This is the first study
obesity 1859 increase UI risk at 24 months (OR 1.13, 95% CI [0.74, 1.72], P = 0.58). This is the first study to include obesity as the primary independent variable. Outcomes indicate that obesity (BMI ≥ 30) may increase the UI
obesity 1927 This is the first study to include obesity as the primary independent variable. Outcomes indicate that obesity (BMI ≥ 30) may increase the UI risk at 12 and 24 months after RLRP. Well-designed randomized controlled
obesity 2147 with strict control of confounders are needed to make results comparable.1. IntroductionWorldwide, obesity has long been related to prostate cancer progression [[1]] and has become a growing health problem for
obesity 2283 prostate cancer progression [[1]] and has become a growing health problem for the prevalence of global obesity which is increasing [[2]]. Therefore, urologists are going to meet more obese participants with prostate
obesity 7044 1310 participants. The overall pooled OR indicated that there was no significant association between obesity and UI in patients who underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RLRP) (odds ratio
obesity 7413 1461 participants. The overall pooled OR indicated that there was no significant association between obesity and UI (OR 1.82, 95% CI 0.92 to 3.58, P = 0.08). Patients were then stratified by the surgical methods.
obesity 7587 then stratified by the surgical methods. In LRP subgroup, there was no significant association between obesity and UI (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.35 to 3.66, P = 0.83). In RLRP subgroup, there was also no significant association
obesity 7712 95% CI 0.35 to 3.66, P = 0.83). In RLRP subgroup, there was also no significant association between obesity and UI (OR 2.06, 95% CI 0.92 to 4.61, P = 0.08) (Figure 2(b)).3.6. UI at 6 MonthsThree trials reporting
obesity 7962 1310 participants. The overall pooled OR indicated that there was no significant association between obesity and UI in patients who underwent RLRP (OR 1.92, 95% CI 0.91 to 4.06, P = 0.09) (Figure 2(c)).3.7. UI
obesity 8244 1310 participants. The overall pooled OR indicated that there was a significant association between obesity and UI in patients who underwent RLRP (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.21 to 4.88, P = 0.01) (Figure 2(d)).3.8. UI
obesity 8480 reporting the UI data at 24 months consisted of 2639 participants. We performed a subgroup analysis on obesity ; the pooled results indicated there was no significant association between obesity and UI in both BMI
obesity 8563 subgroup analysis on obesity; the pooled results indicated there was no significant association between obesity and UI in both BMI ≥ 30 versus 25 ≤ BMI < 30 (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.89 to 2.49, P = 0.13) and BMI ≥
obesity 8785 BMI < 25 (OR 1.72, 95% CI 0.92 to 3.21, P = 0.09) subgroups. However, the overall pooled OR indicated obesity increased the risk of UI at 24 months in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (OR 1.64, 95%
obesity 9051 by the surgical methods including LRP and RLRP, in LRP subgroup, the pooled results showed that the obesity does not increase the risk of UI at 24 months (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.72, P = 0.58). However, in
obesity 9212 1.13, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.72, P = 0.58). However, in RLRP subgroup, the pooled results indicated that the obesity increased the risk of UI at 24 months (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.56, P < 0.001). The overall pooled
obesity 9346 at 24 months (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.56, P < 0.001). The overall pooled results demonstrated that obesity increased the risk of UI at 24 months (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.14, P < 0.001) (Figure 3(b)).4. DiscussionObese
obesity 9767 tract symptoms [[10]–[12]]. However, it is still controversial in terms of the relationship between obesity and UI after RP. Wolin et al. [[13]] showed that preprostatectomy obesity may be significant factor
obesity 9841 the relationship between obesity and UI after RP. Wolin et al. [[13]] showed that preprostatectomy obesity may be significant factor in UI after RP, and this result was consistent with previous studies by Kim
obesity 10723 RP. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed to systematically evaluate the association between obesity and UI after RP. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first meta-analysis with a focus on
obesity 10857 best of our knowledge, this study is the first meta-analysis with a focus on the relationship between obesity and UI.Basiri et al. [[21]] performed a meta-analysis regarding UI between RLRP and LRP groups. The
obesity 11301 consisting of 6 trials, our meta-analysis demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between obesity and UI at 12 and 24 months in patients who underwent RLRP. However, there was no significant association
obesity 11422 and 24 months in patients who underwent RLRP. However, there was no significant association between obesity and UI at 24 months in patients who underwent LRP.Currently, there is a lack of data in terms of predictors
obesity 13072 required.Although there are lots of studies that focus on UI after RP, this meta-analysis is the first to include obesity as the primary independent variable. However, there are several limitations of our study. First of all,
obesity 14279 were not included in the current meta-analysis.5. ConclusionsIn conclusion, this study indicated that obesity may increase the risk of UI at 12 and 24 months in patients who underwent RLRP. However, there was no
obesity 14421 and 24 months in patients who underwent RLRP. However, there was no significant association between obesity and UI at 24 months in patients with LRP. The results should be confirmed by well-designed randomized

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