Inadequate sleep as a contributor to type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

Existing Reviews

Please note, new claims can take a short while to show up.

No claims yet.

Annotation Summary

Term Occurence Count Dictionary
diabetes mellitus 2 endocrinologydiseases
hyperglycemia 5 endocrinologydiseases
obesity 8 endocrinologydiseases
type 2 diabetes mellitus 1 endocrinologydiseases
cortisol 6 endocrinologydiseasesdrugs

Graph of close proximity drug and disease terms (within 200 characters).

Note: If this graph is empty, then there are no terms that meet the proximity constraint.

Review

Having read the paper, please pick a pair of statements from the paper to indicate that a drug and disease are related.

Select Drug Character Offset Drug Term Instance
cortisol 25355 biological pathways. It is known that sleep in humans is a refractory period for the stress hormones cortisol , norepinephrine and epinephrine. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis downregulates these stress
cortisol 25555 these stress hormones at night during sleep; however, if sleep is insufficient it results in higher cortisol levels during the day.[47] Cortisol is involved in many metabolic processes, including inhibiting insulin
cortisol 25707 involved in many metabolic processes, including inhibiting insulin production, thus increased levels of cortisol are associated with insulin resistance and an increased need for energy-dense foods.[14] Although studies
cortisol 25876 for energy-dense foods.[14] Although studies in adults have found an association between increased cortisol level in the evening and increased insulin resistance the following morning,[46], [48] Klingenberg et
cortisol 26027 resistance the following morning,[46], [48] Klingenberg et al.[36] found no differences in morning cortisol levels in healthy male adolescents following sleep restriction compared with the adequate sleep condition.
cortisol 26179 following sleep restriction compared with the adequate sleep condition. In adults, an increased exposure to cortisol due to short sleep duration contributes to increased fat accumulation in the visceral region,[49] which
Select Disease Character Offset Disease Term Instance
diabetes mellitus 693 to provide for the first time an overview of the literature on sleep and its association with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) biomarkers in children and adolescents. For this narrative review, 23 studies were retained (21
diabetes mellitus 2914 development of interventions aimed at improving sleep habits and, subsequently, health outcomes.Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a global public health concern and lifestyle changes, such as improving diet composition, increasing
hyperglycemia 12789 and three of the glucose homeostasis outcome measurements (that is, glycated hemoglobin, short-term hyperglycemia and long-term hyperglycemia). This relationship remained after controlling for obstructive sleep apnea
hyperglycemia 12817 homeostasis outcome measurements (that is, glycated hemoglobin, short-term hyperglycemia and long-term hyperglycemia ). This relationship remained after controlling for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and level of obesity.
hyperglycemia 16651 between sleep duration measured by actigraphy and sleep timing assessed by diary and insulin resistance/ hyperglycemia in apparently healthy adolescents and observed a significant association between sleep fragmentation
hyperglycemia 17110 circadian rhythm sleep disorders[39] have also shown an association between sleep fragmentation and hyperglycemia . Matthews et al.[32] also noted that the amount their adolescent participants slept each night was much
hyperglycemia 47515 sleep duration and fasting glucose was found (β=−0.043, s.e.=0.021, P=0.04). An increased risk of hyperglycemia (⩾100 mg dl−1) for those sleeping ⩽8 h compared with those sleeping 9–10 h was observed
obesity 2319 school days.[3] Lack of sleep is associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes, including obesity , cardiovascular disease, depression, poor academic achievement and reduced quality of life/well-being.[4],
obesity 12269 insulin, higher fasting insulin and lower whole-body insulin sensitivity, independent of the level of obesity and age.Javaheri et al.[30] reported a U-shaped relationship between sleep duration determined by actigraphy
obesity 12642 with HOMA-IR. Similarly, Koren et al.[31] also observed a U-shaped relationship in adolescents with obesity between sleep duration measured by PSG and three of the glucose homeostasis outcome measurements (that
obesity 12928 hyperglycemia). This relationship remained after controlling for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and level of obesity . Moreover, Koren et al.[31] found that a sleep duration between 7 and 8.5 h per night in obese children
obesity 27617 evidence on the efficacy of sleep improvement programs and their potential influence upon addressing obesity and metabolic disturbances. Collectively, the evidence in this field is scarce and much needs to be
obesity 43928 glucose levels, HOMA-IR,WBISI, IGI and AIRgAge, sex, Tanner stage, OSAS and BMI z-score (degree of obesity )In adolescents with obesity, data displayed a U-shaped association between sleep duration, fasting glucose
obesity 43956 HOMA-IR,WBISI, IGI and AIRgAge, sex, Tanner stage, OSAS and BMI z-score (degree of obesity)In adolescents with obesity , data displayed a U-shaped association between sleep duration, fasting glucose (R2 quadratic=0.201,
obesity 46195 questionnaire with parental helpHOMA-IRAge, sex, nutrition, physical activity and family history of obesity No association was found between sleep duration and HOMA-IR in the overall sample. Sleep duration was
type 2 diabetes mellitus 686 review was to provide for the first time an overview of the literature on sleep and its association with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) biomarkers in children and adolescents. For this narrative review, 23 studies were retained (21

You must be authorized to submit a review.